Tag Archives: Sylvia Wishart

How To Paint Like a Woman…

…(or Sculpt, or Photograph, or Perform, or….)

Savasana — The Release
oil on linen, 44″ x 32″
© Amy Funderburk 2008 – 2011, All Rights Reserved
Meditation image from the series Images From the Otherworld

 

Have you seen The Object, that iconic surrealist sculpture in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York? This fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon that likely graces the pages of your art history book was created in 1936 by artist and photographer Méret Oppenheim (1913–1985). Oppenheim, though born in Germany, was a Swiss artist.

And she was female.

In honor of Women’s History Month in March, after relating my college tale of being told by a fellow student that I “paint like a man,” I challenged you to list all the famous women artists and those artists who identify as female who you can remember. So far, we have a cornucopia of 109 artists!

Despite the noteworthy nature of The Object, Oppenheim was not mentioned on anyone’s list. However, it will probably come as no surprise that the name on everyone’s list was a different female Surrealist and Modern artist – Frida Kahlo.

Kahlo (1907-1954), was a Mexican artist known for her self-portraits that reflected her physical pain and tragedy. Like several of the women most often listed, though she was married to a fellow artist, through achieving her own fame, she managed to not merely stand in her husband’s shadow.

Since a quick Internet search for Kahlo’s name will result in a vast array of merchandise available for purchase, including pencil cases, makeup bags, and paper dolls, I think the argument could be made that she ultimately eclipsed the success of her spouse, muralist Diego Rivera.

I would also venture to say that American Modernist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986), included by most of the contributors, is more of a household name than her albeit famous husband, photographer and art dealer Alfred Stieglitz.

Unfortunately, none of us remembered to list Elaine de Kooning.1

Pablo Picasso fans will know the name Dora Maar (1907-1997). However, most of us do not know her for her own Surrealist photography, paintings and poetry, but for being a muse and lover to the infamous Cubist.

And for those who are well acquainted with that Artistic Wyeth Triumvirate of NC, Andrew, and Jamie, did you also know that Andrew had two sisters? Henriette (1907-1997) and Carolyn (1909-1994) were also artists.

Despite the absence of names such as Oppenheim and Maar on our collective lists, I am happy to say that the Surrealist movement was well represented beyond Kahlo. Diverse American artist Dorothea Tanning (1910-2012) – a painter, printmaker, sculptor, writer, and poet – was listed twice, and British-born Surrealist painter Leonora Carrington (1917-2011), who lived in Mexico City, was mentioned by several contributors.

In addition to O’Keeffe, others who appeared on multiple participants’ lists included Impressionists Mary Cassatt (American, lived in France; 1844-1926) and Berthe Morisot (French, 1841-1895); Abstract Expressionists Lee Krasner (1908-1984) and Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011); American figurative and portrait painter Alice Neel (1900-1984); American Feminist and installation artist Judy Chicago (b. 1939); conceptual and performance artist Marina Abramović (Yugoslavian-born; b. 1946); British Modernist sculptor Barbara Hepworth (1903-1975); French-American sculptor and installation artist Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010); and Postmodernist, conceptual and Feminist artist Barbara Kruger (1945).

Additional artists who are among those on my own list as well as appearing on the list of one other contributor were French Realist painter Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899); French sculptor Camille Claudel (1864-1943); Italian Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653); German Expressionist Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945); Japanese multidisciplinary, installation, performance, conceptual and Pop artist Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929); American photographers Annie Leibovitz (b. 1949), Sally Mann (b. 1951), and Cindy Sherman (b. 1954); American sculptor Louise Nevelson (Ukrainian-born; 1899-1988); and Japanese-born conceptual, multimedia, and performance artist and musician Yoko Ono (b. 1933).

Names new to me who were listed by at least two others include British artists Tracey Emin, Tanith Hicks, Paula Rego, and Jenny Saville.

Emin (b. 1963) and Saville (b. 1970) are both Young British Artists (YBA’s), a loose group of visual artists that also includes Damien Hirst. To create her autobiographical, often provocative work, Emin uses various media including needlework, traditionally considered a task for women.2 Saville is known for her large-format paintings of nudes.

Rego (Portuguese-born; b. 1935) is a painter, pastellist, and printmaker whose work is often based on folk tales, fables, and storybooks. Hicks, who creates jewelry, masks, and other items, is inspired from a similar source – European folklore, myths, and fairytales.

I was determined to reach 50 names on my own list – and I’m happy to say that I surpassed that goal! During this time period, I also ran across many other creatives who I had forgotten to mention – including another important Surrealist, the Argentinean painter, illustrator, and writer Leonor Fini (1907-1996) – as well as artists who were new to me, such as Agnes Martin (1912-2004), an American minimalist abstract painter born in Canada.

Alas, for every name, there are many others who we thus far have neglected to list, and, like all artists, they each have their own story worth telling. Eva Hesse (1936-1970) was a Postminimalist sculptor with a tragic life whose family fled Hitler’s Germany when she was only three. Rachel Ruysch (1664-1750), a Dutch floral still-life painter, enjoyed great success as court painter to the Elector Palatine in Düsseldorf, Bavaria, Germany.

Were you surprised when you read Ruysch’s dates? If you only know the names of contemporary women artists, you may assume that there were few to no female creatives in the age of the Old Masters. Such artistic forerunners laid important groundwork for those who came after, for we stand on the shoulders of giants.

Three noteworthy classical painters from the Renaissance through the 18th century who I am glad to have included are Lavinia Fontana, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Lebrun.

Renaissance artist Lavinia Fontana (1542-1614) became the first woman painter from Bologna to achieve fame throughout Italy. Though she had 11 children, Fontana pursued a flourishing art career while her husband tended to the household chores, in addition to painting backgrounds and frames for his wife. She was commissioned to paint religious, mythological, and nude subjects as well as portraits, thus expanding the scope of subject matter created by female painters in her day.3 According to the National Museum of Women in the Arts, “Fontana is regarded as the first woman artist, working within the same sphere as her male counterparts, outside a court or convent.”4

Successful Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) brought the dramatic, theatrical “Caravaggesque” style of painting from Rome to Florence, Genoa, and Naples. Her version of Judith Beheading Holofernes (1614-1620) features a biblical heroine who looks like she’s fully capable of getting the grisly job done! Most versions of this theme by Gentileschi’s contemporaries make Judith look as if she is barely able to lift a sword. 5

Élisabeth Louise or Marie-Louise-Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (1755-1842) became the court painter to the French queen, Marie Antoinette. After escaping Paris during the French Revolution, Vigée-Lebrun went on to enjoy fame across Europe as well as France, living for a time in Italy, Austria, and Russia. 6 During this period of exile, Vigée-Lebrun commanded much higher prices for her portraits than did her contemporaries. 7

Prior to the French Revolution, painter Jacques-Louis David paid Vigée-Lebrun a so-called “compliment” that may sound quite familiar if you read my initial article on this subject. After Vigée-Lebrun’s admission to the Royal Academy, during an exhibition at the Salon, David told his fellow artist that “one of her paintings was so good it looked as if it had been painted by a man.” 8

Fast forward to today, and my favorite “new to me” inspirational artist story has to be that of Phyllida Barlow. This British sculptor (b. 1944) celebrated her 73rd birthday in April. Her star began to really rise in 2010, and she was recently selected to represent the UK at the 57th Venice Biennale that opened to the public on May 13, and runs through November 26, 2017. 9

In her recent article about Barlow, Charlotte Higgins offers some insight into the artist’s recent rise to fame. While gender may have been a factor in delaying her success, Higgins also cites some good news: that “the art world has, over the past decade, been collectively in the mood to reassess the work of older women.” 10

In keeping with this trend, according to Andrew Goldstein in his recent article for Artnet, the Board of Directors of the Venice Biennale has recently been awarding the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement as a way “to embrace an accomplished older female artist whose contributions had gone without due recognition for too long.” This year, the honor went to Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939). Also a painter, this American artist is best known for her pioneering contributions to Feminist performance art. 11

Though only around one third of this year’s Venice Biennale artists are female, Liliana Porter (Argentinean-born; b. 1941), who lives and works in New York, is participating with a sculptural installation in the Pavilion of Time and Infinity.12 In contrast, the curators of the 2017 Whitney Biennial in New York have selected a much better balance of both women and minority artists. Most of the oil and acrylic painters included this year are women, including 87 year old former Minimalist Jo Baer (b. 1929).13  14

I wholeheartedly agree with environmental artist Jeanne-Claude (1935-2009), another woman from my list, when she said that artists do not retire. Just ask 88 year old Japanese multidisciplinary artist Yayoi Kusama (b.1929), whose retrospective exhibition, Infinity Mirrors, just closed at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC, featuring works from her 65 year career as well as recent paintings. 15

And of course, well-known American folk artist Grandma Moses (1860-1961) didn’t even begin painting until she was 78. But best of all is Aboriginal artist Loongkoonan (b. c.1910). This Nyikina elder from Western Australia began painting around age 95, and, now around 107, is still exhibiting her work.

And you thought yoga, meditation, and a vegetarian diet were going to be my secrets for longevity.

Sometimes, good things take time to come to fruition. Just this March, the Musée Camille Claudel opened in Claudel’s former family home in Nogent-sur-Seine, France. Claudel was a student, studio assistant, artistic collaborator, and lover of sculptor Auguste Rodin, who cast a very large and dark shadow. After her breakup with Rodin, she destroyed much of her own work before entering an asylum, but the museum was able to acquire 43 surviving drawings, casts, and sculptures.16

Claudel does appear on our list below, along with 108 other creatives. Many you may already know, but for any names new to you, I hope you’ll take time to explore the bodies of work of these varied artists who work along the full spectrum of styles and media, including painting, photography, printmaking, performance art, installation, illustration, choreography, and activism.

While some participants chose to list their well-deserving colleagues as well as those women already in the Art History books, I had already chosen not to do so, with a couple of noteworthy exceptions, lest the list get too unwieldy. I have marked my contributions with asterisks. While I hope you will take the time to research the works of many of these women, I call your attention to a few particular favorites:

Diana Al-Hadid (Syrian-born; b. 1981): her striking, elegant mixed-media sculptures, installations, and drawings often contain figural elements. Al-Hadid now lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Meinrad Craighead (b. 1936): this American visionary artist, a former Catholic nun, explores the theme of the Divine Feminine in her artwork, often including mythological elements and animals.

Evelyn DeMorgan (1855-1919): an English painter influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, particularly Edward Burne-Jones. Spiritualism was a recurring inspiration for the artist.

Julie Heffernan (b. 1956): an American painter known for her symbolic self-portraits and lush fantasy landscapes. Her most recent works have an environmental message.

Michele Oka Doner (b. 1945): an American sculptor who merges natural forms with figural elements in her most recent pieces. The wide scope of her work also includes public art.

Sylvia Wishart (1936-2008): a Scottish landscape artist from Orkney. She created layers of interest in her works by frequently depicting reflections and using texture.

My deep appreciation to all those who participated – thank you for remembering artists both known and unknown to me, and for remembering some of those who I had neglected to list.

While this was more of an exercise rather than an exhaustive overview, there are so many more names in my Women Artists book that I roll my eyes in frustration that I didn’t list them all. If you don’t see your favorites here, please add the names in the Comments section of my blog post and let’s keep the list growing!

I think I’ll add Suzanne Valadon right now and make it 110….

All the best, and Namaste,

Amy

(Please note: I am humbled and honored that some of you chose to include me on your lists! I’ll do my very best to try to be remotely worthy of inclusion in such esteemed company.)

  1. *Marina Abramović
  2. *Diana Al-Hadid
  3. Jackie Anderson
  4. *Laurie Anderson
  5. *Phyllia Barlow
  6. *Jennifer Bartlett
  7. *Jackie Battenfield
  8. Vanessa Beescroft
  9. Gretchen Bennett
  10. *Rosa Bonheur
  11. Lee Bontecou
  12. *Louise Bourgeois
  13. *Romaine Brooks
  14. Laurel Burch
  15. Dora Carrington
  16. *Leonora Carrington
  17. Lorena Carrington
  18. *Mary Cassatt
  19. Karen Cater
  20. *Judy Chicago
  21. *Camille Claudel
  22. *Meinrad Craighead
  23. *Imogen Cunningham
  24. E.V. Day
  25. Jay Defeo
  26. *Evelyn DeMorgan
  27. *Elsie Dinsmore Popkin
  28. *Lois Dodd
  29. Marlene Dumas
  30. Tracey Emin
  31. Karen Finley
  32. Beth Fischer
  33. *Janet Fish
  34. *Audrey Flack
  35. *Lavinia Fontana
  36. *Helen Frankenthaler
  37. Amy Funderburk
  38. Coco Fusco
  39. Penelope Gavin
  40. *Artemisia Gentileschi
  41. *The Guerilla Girls
  42. Joyce Gunn Cairns
  43. *Grace Hartigan
  44. *Barbara Hepworth
  45. Tanith Hicks
  46. *Jeanne-Claude
  47. *Julie Heffernan
  48. Jenny Holzer
  49. *Anna Hyatt Huntington
  50. Jayne Johnson
  51. *Frida Kahlo
  52. Margaret Keane
  53. Karen Kilimnik
  54. *Käthe Kollwitz
  55. *Lee Krasner
  56. Barbara Kruger
  57. *Yayoi Kusama
  58. *Dorothea Lange
  59. *Annie Leibovitz
  60. Vivian Maier
  61. *Sally Mann
  62. Linda McCartney
  63. Paola McClure
  64. *Beverly McIver
  65. Julie Mehretu
  66. Joan Mitchell
  67.  *Merry Moor Winnett
  68. Polly Morgan
  69. *Berthe Morisot
  70. *Grandma Moses
  71. *P. Buckley Moss
  72. *Alice Neel
  73. Deirdre Nelson
  74. *Louise Nevelson
  75. *Michelle Oka Doner
  76. *Georgia O’Keeffe
  77. *Yoko Ono
  78. Catherine Opie
  79. Ru Paul
  80. Elizabeth Peyton
  81. Jody Pinto
  82. *Beatrix Potter
  83. Paula Rego
  84. Charlotte “Lotte” Reiniger
  85. PJ Richards
  86. Bridget Riley
  87. Faith Ringgold
  88. Beth Robertson Fiddes
  89. Lorraine Robson
  90. Jennifer Robson
  91. Jenny Saville
  92. *Susan Seddon Boulet
  93. *Cindy Sherman
  94. Jill Skulina
  95. Elizabeth Siddal
  96. Kiki Smith
  97. Nancy Spero
  98. Aileen Stackhouse
  99. Rima Staines
  100. Dorothea Tanning
  101. Jocelyn Taylor
  102. Maggie Taylor
  103. Jaune Quick-to-See-Smith
  104. *Suzanne Valadon
  105. *Élisabeth Louise Vigée LeBrun
  106. Kara Walker
  107. Alison Watt
  108. *Carrie Mae Weems
  109. Rachel Whiteread
  110. *Sylvia Wishart

1 Elaine de Kooning (1918-1989), an Abstract Expressionist and Figurative Expressionist, was married to artist Willem de Kooning.

2 Tracey Emin Studio. “Biography,” accessed May 24, 2017 http://www.traceyeminstudio.com/biography/

 3 Nancy G. Heller, Women Artists – an Illustrated History (New York: Abbeville Press, 1987) 19-20

4 National Museum of Women in the Arts. “Artist Profile: Lavinia Fontana,” accessed May 22, 2017, https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/lavinia-fontana

5 Heller, Women Artists – an Illustrated History, 29-32.

6 Heller, Women Artists – an Illustrated History, 58-60.

7 Lara Marlowe, “The French Feminist Painter Who Flattered Marie Antoinette,” The Irish Times, November 19, 2015, http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/art-and-design/the-french-feminist-painter-who-flattered-marie-antoinette-1.2435146

8 Marlowe, “The French Feminist Painter Who Flattered Marie Antoinette.”

9 Mark Brown, “Phyllida Barlow: an Artistic Outsider Who Has Finally Come Inside,” The Guardian, April 28, 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/apr/28/phyllida-barlow-artist-success-2017-venice-biennale

10 Charlotte Higgins, “Bish-bash-bosh: How Phyllida Barlow Conquered the Art World at 73,” The Guardian, May 9, 2017, https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/may/09/bish-bash-bosh-how-phyllida-barlow-conquered-the-art-world-at-73

11 Andrew Goldstein, “Anne Imhof’s Brooding Goth Performance Wins the 2017 Venice Biennale’s Golden Lion,” Artnet News, May 13, 2017, https://news.artnet.com/art-world/venice-biennale-golden-lion-959171

12 Kevin McGarry, “57th Venice Biennale ‘Viva Arte Viva’,” Art Agenda, May 17, 2017, http://www.art-agenda.com/reviews/57th-venice-biennale/

13 Jason Farago, “A User’s Guide to the Whitney Biennial,” The New York Times, March 8, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/arts/design/a-users-guide-to-the-whitney-biennial.html?_r=0

14 The 78th Whitney Biennial, not without its own heated controversy outside the scope of this article, opened March 17, and runs though June 11, 2017.

15 Hirshhorn. “About the Exhibition,” accessed May 24, 2017, https://hirshhorn.si.edu/kusama/the-exhibition/

16 Brigit Katz, “Museum Devoted to Camille Claudel, Long Overshadowed by Rodin, Opens in France,” Smithsonian.com, March 30, 2017, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/museum-devoted-camille-claudel-overshadowed-rodin-opens-france-180962718/

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The Day We Left Orkney. Part I: You *Can* Get There From Here

 

First edition originally published January 23, 2015

Hoy Sound Sylvia Wishart, 1987 oil and mixed media on paper, from the Pier Arts Centre Collection © the Estate of Sylvia Wishart

Sylvia Wishart – Hoy Sound
1987, oil and mixed media on paper
from the Pier Arts Centre Collection, used with permission
© the Estate of Sylvia Wishart

When I do my home yoga practice, the light comes in through the dining room window, casting rectangular reflections on the glass of one of my photographs of Loch Ness. This interplay of light and shape layered on shape always reminds me of an artist whose work I was delighted to discover while we were travelling in Orkney during our Scotland trip in the fall of 2012. Each time I see them, these reflections conjure up Sylvia Wishart’s compositions.

Part I: You CAN Get There From Here. 

When planning your itinerary to Scotland, don’t let the seeming remoteness of any of the outer islands deter you from a visit. While there are many daytrip tours heading to the Orkney Islands from the Scottish mainland, there is so much to explore, especially if you plan to do any island hopping, that I recommend you allow several days here. We allotted four, but could easily have stayed longer, and as fans of prehistoric sites, we thoroughly enjoyed our visit.

Glacial erosion resulted in stone beaten by the sea. Stretches of treeless, windblown land are topped with distant rounded hills — a visual combination to inspire the artist’s heart and eye. This is the furthest north I have ever been, and place names here are derived from Old Norse as a reminder of Orkney’s history and your proximity to Scandinavia.

The Mainland, as the largest island is known, is particularly littered with prehistoric remains — including The Ring of Brodgar, an amazingly large stone circle that boasts Viking graffiti on one of its stones. As you drive along a thin strip of land sandwiched between two lochs through the archeologically rich Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site, you will see such wonders one right after another. An ongoing archeological dig at the Ness of Brodgar reveals layers of history that hint at the great importance of this area to the ancients.

The Watchstone Near the Stones of Stenness in the Heart of Neolithic Orkney, Scotland digital photograph © Amy Funderburk 2012 All Rights Reserved

The Watchstone — near the Stones of Stenness in the Heart of Neolithic Orkney, © Amy Funderburk 2012, All Rights Reserved

The weather was beautiful during most of our Orkney days, though my husband swears he saw snow mixed with the spitting rain as we boarded the small ferry to get to these islands. After all, they say that you can experience all four seasons in one day in Scotland. I was more enamored with the small pod of dolphins I spotted immediately as we pulled away from the dock than whether or not any of the cold precipitation was actually frozen. The day we went to the capital city of Kirkwall was rainy, but since we were inside the highly recommended Orkney Museum in the Tankerness House, the Earl’s Palace, and splendid Saint Magnus Cathedral for the day, our plans worked out fairly well.

Until, that is, the day we left.

It was my husband’s birthday. We had a grand itinerary planned — we were to board the departing ferry at 11 AM, then have a lovely drive down to Loch Ness, stopping at various points of interest to photograph along the way.

But Mother Nature had other ideas. A big storm was due, and it had started its approach the previous night. The waves crashed dramatically along the causeways as we drove around on our last  day. Our bed and breakfast hostess in Ophir was very accommodating, and offered us our room for another night should we need it.  But all seemed well according to her sources — the ferries were scheduled to run as usual the next morning. At any rate, we had already booked accommodations at our bed and breakfast on the northern shore of Loch Ness, so I was very relieved that all seemed well with our departure plans.

After eating breakfast the next morning, including a cute birthday cupcake for Jimmy, we packed the rental car and off we went to catch the ferry on South Ronaldsay. After a 45 minute or so drive, we pulled into the carpark for the ferry, only to learn from the office that during the crossing earlier that morning, the captain found the waves too choppy and treacherous, so if he made another trip, it would not be until the end of the day.

Not one for much spontaneity or the uncertainty of a crossing with no guarantee, I immediately went into lateral thinking mode as if I were a contestant on The Amazing Race. “The other ferry company!” I thought. “The one that sets out from Stromness — they have larger ferries. I bet they are running!” With a cartoon light bulb over my head that shone brightly with this idea, I eagerly called the number that was listed in my guidebook. Luckily, they were operating as scheduled! However, the next crossing wouldn’t be until 4:45 PM. So much for our leisurely drive on a sunny day, but at least we would be able to get off the island and keep to our plans to arrive in Loch Ness, albeit several hours later than expected. After making a booking, we headed out, driving north for an hour to Stromness.

We had hoped to visit this town of stone and narrow lanes on our trip, but as it goes with an overloaded itinerary, we hadn’t made it. Now we had a few hours to spend here before our ferry departure. The main draw for us was to visit The Pier Arts Centre, so after finding the ferry dock, the Arts Centre, and a place to park (the latter being easier said than done!), we set out to explore this artistic treasure trove of over 180 works by 20th Century British artists. Founded in 1979, as the name suggests, the Centre is right on the water, an old building originally converted to hold the collection of founder Margaret Gardiner.

 

View of the Harbor from Inside The Pier Arts Centre, Stromness, Orkney digital photograph © Amy Funderburk 2012 All Rights Reserved www.AmyFunderburkArtist.com With kind assistance and permission from The Pier Arts Centre

View of the Harbor from Inside The Pier Arts Centre on a Rainy Day, Stromness, Orkney
digital photograph
© Amy Funderburk 2012 All Rights Reserved
With kind assistance and permission from The Pier Arts Centre

Before our artistic exploration could commence, however, there was also the matter of notifying the Loch Ness bed and breakfast of our delayed departure. My calls weren’t going through on my mobile for some reason, so email was my only hope.

The Pier Arts Centre to the rescue! The staff was very accommodating and welcoming in our time of need. They had a room with free WiFi, so I was able to use my laptop to contact our next home away from home and alert the hostess to our impending tardiness.  Shelter from the cold rain, a rescued day spent looking at a rich, varied art collection, and a free WiFi hotspot as well — what more could The Pier Arts Centre provide?

I had first seen a piece of Sylvia Wishart’s work at the Orkney Museum in Kirkwall. Her signature use of textures and unusual reflected shapes, as well as her penchant for including rabbits and birds made Wishart’s distinctive style stick in my mind. As I sat in the meeting room that graced my laptop with WiFi capability, when I saw the large painting before me, I knew it was clearly painted by the same artist. It was there that I fell in love.

Stay tuned for my next post, Part II: Sylvia Wishart. The best artist you may have never heard of, unless you’ve visited Orkney.

Many thanks to the Pier Arts Centre for their assistance.  The above image of Hoy Sound by Sylvia Wishart — the painting that hung in the meeting room — was provided by the Pier Arts Centre and used here with their kind permission. For more information, please visit their website.

For a wealth of information about Orkney, I highly recommend the website Orkneyjar: the Heritage of the Orkney Islands.

All the best, and Namaste,

Amy

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